arrow_up-blue blog branches consultations events facebook-icon facebook-icon2 factsheet forum-icon forum hands key link location lock mail measure menu_plus news pdf pdf2 phone policies publications related search share subjectguide twitter-icon word youtube-icon

Latest evidence

Speaking up on nursing pay

Shekiera, London

05 Sep

Shekiera, London

The NHS bursary is adequate for what the student nurses have to sacrifice. Our course is like no other course. While we only attend university a maximum of 3 times a week, we work unsociable hours and we have placements that have a requirement of over 1500 hours over three years. The student bursary can save the dreams of people who want to do nursing but have debt or childcare needs.

Read full story

Anna, Aberdeen

18 Aug

Anna, Aberdeen

Although I will not be affected by the change, I feel this is a great injustice to those prospective students starting in 2017. As a student nurse we put in far more time to our degree that almost any other course and have to work within the hosptials as a mandatory part of our course. How is it fair that we should essentially have to pay to work within the hospitals where we do such vital work?

Read full story

Holly, Shropshire

16 Aug

Holly, Shropshire

I think that without the bursary nursing students will struggle, especially with placement hours and a heavy workload. Whilst at university there is little oppurtunity for nursing students to get a job to support themsleves financially.

Read full story

Caralyn , London

07 Aug

Caralyn , London

This year marks my tenth as a neonatal nurse. Everyday I am in awe of my job and the tiny little people and amazing families I meet. Without a nursing bursary, I don't know how I would have achieved my nursing degree. To think removing nursing bursaries won't have dire consequences is ludicrous. My concern for the future of nursing and our patients safety has never been greater.

Read full story

Marcus , Luton

29 Jul

Marcus , Luton

I currently work as an assistant practitioner. Now the nursing bursary is set to be scrapped, I am reconsidering applying for nurse training. I cannot afford ro take on any extra debt as I have a mortgage and other household bills which I need to meet.

Read full story

Mel, Isle of Wight

25 Jul

Mel, Isle of Wight

My bursary ensured I could eat and sleep soundly without worry. I had to work exceptionally hard just to get the grades to complete my nursing course. If I had to work as well, I would have dropped out. I am proud to call myself a nurse and the young people I work with fill me every day with awe. I fear to think I could have missed out on the last 20 years for the cost of a bursary.

Read full story

Helen, Shropshire

24 Jul

Helen, Shropshire

Without the bursary I would have been unable to ever consider training as a student nurse. I am a single mother of four children, aged 36 and have always had an income. Without support of the bursary I would have been unable to pay for the childcare fees alone. I think this change will prevent older more mature students applying.

Read full story

Natalie, Cornwall

24 Jul

Natalie, Cornwall

I am working as a HCA and studying on an access to HE health pathway. I had planned on studying a nursing degree but will now have to rethink due to the changes. At 31, I don't want the debt.

Read full story

Sue, Essex

24 Jul

Sue, Essex

I trained 30 years ago in a very different system. Now it's my daughters turn to train as a midwife. She will complete her A levels in 2017, just as the new system starts. I am doing my best to persuade her into a different career. Mentors like me struggle already to mentor students with current shortages and I can only see it getting worse.

Read full story

Samantha, Buckingham

23 Jul

Samantha, Buckingham

How can the government treat the nursing degree the same as any other degree? When I studied for my degree, we had three placements each year lasting 12 weeks each and we were expected to work 37.5 hrs per week depending on when our mentors worked. We only had three weeks break in the summer not three months as some other students might have. With other degrees you have time to work to help fund your living expenses and subsidise your degree - not with nursing!

Read full story

Victoria, Manchester

23 Jul

Victoria, Manchester

I would have still applied for my nursing course. I would be happier to be in more debt if it meant I could get more finance over the three years. I am really struggling on the NHS bursary. I am into my overdraft and have also had to borrow from family. If I was entitled to the same finance as other students it would make my life a lot easier.

Read full story

Ann, Leicestershire

22 Jul

Ann, Leicestershire

I qualified as a mental health nurse two years ago. Without the bursary I could not have done so and I doubt many of the other mature students like me would have been able to. There were only 14 of us that qualified in mental health that year, all of us were mature students and each of us brought a different life experience to our practice. I was course rep and consequently heard many of the stories of hardship faced to work through the course.

Read full story

Lucy, Leicester

20 Jul

Lucy, Leicester

Basically I would not even be on the nursing degree without my bursary. I saved for quite a while for university while working in my previous career. This was not enough to cover the extortionate costs of university rent. As a nursing student the bursary may not be a lot, however it does help.

Read full story

Amy , Northern Ireland

20 Jul

Amy , Northern Ireland

Without the bursary I would not have been able to get to any of my placements. The bursary covered 50% of my travel costs, the other half I funded using wages from part time jobs I had to have simply because the bursary did not cover the cost.

Read full story

Danielle, Rushden

19 Jul

Danielle, Rushden

I am hoping to become a nurse in the near future. I think it is disgusting that the bursary is now being taken away. I am currently working towards my entry requirements to study for a nursing course and now I not only have to complete all of this study and hard work, I now have to pay to get the degree.

Read full story

Abbie, Essex

19 Jul

Abbie, Essex

As a student nurse it is almost impossible to work part time. It isn't like any other university course, it is like a job as well as trying to earn a degree. As a student nurse, I have been expected to travel 60 miles a day to my placement area. If I didn't get my bursary or my travel reimbursement from the bursary, I don't know how someone is expected to pay out for petrol every week when you are not earning and cannot really work.

Read full story

Mary, Kent

19 Jul

Mary, Kent

I am starting my first year of my adult nursing degree in a few weeks, and I will be one of the last few to recieve the bursary. I am a mature student and have given up my full time job to do my degree. I have a house to look after and bills to pay. Without the bursary I couldn't live.

Read full story

Kim, Hampshire

19 Jul

Kim, Hampshire

I am currently working as a HCA for the NHS and studying a level five course with a plan to progress to becoming a qualified nurse. If the bursary changes go ahead then further qualification will not be financially viable to me. At 44 I am not in a position to take on the debt of a degree course. Despite my skills, experience and loyalty to the NHS my career progression will come to an abrupt halt.

Read full story

Lorretta, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

19 Jul

Lorretta, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

I made my decision to start my pre-registration postgraduate diploma in mental health nursing at the age of 27 having already completed a previous degree in psychology. The course was hugely attractive as I could do my nursing in two years and use my degree and previous experience rather than start again at undergraduate level. I am already nearly £30,000 in debt from my first degree, would I increase this by another £36,000 to do this course? As much as I love what I do, I hate to admit I really don't think I could justify it.

Read full story

Lisa, High Wycombe

18 Jul

Lisa, High Wycombe

I would not have been able to afford to study nursing without the bursary. My parents divorced during my last year of school, and I subsequently moved in with my partner after finishing sixth form to start university. Neither of my parents were in a position to financially support me. Had the bursary been unavailable, I could not have afforded to pursue a nursing career and would have had to find work straight away

Read full story