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Maternity and paternity glossary

A glossary to help you understand maternity and paternity abbreviations. 

Maternity and paternity abbreviations explained

 

AfC Agenda for Change

The Agenda for Change handbook contains the national agreements on pay and conditions of service for NHS staff.


AML
Additional maternity leave

All pregnant employees are entitled to 52 weeks maternity leave. AML is the last 26 weeks of that leave.


CML
Compulsory maternity leave

Women must take two weeks of maternity leave (or four weeks if they work in a factory) following the birth of their baby. 


EWC
Expected week of childbirth

EWC is the week beginning on a Sunday in which it is expected that your baby will be born.


KIT days
Keeping in touch days

KIT days allow employees to work for up to 10 days during the 52 week period of maternity leave. You cannot insist on working KIT days.


MA
Maternity allowance

MA is paid by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) for 39 weeks. You may be eligible for MA if you do not earn enough to get SMP, or you are unemployed or self-employed during pregnancy. Use the government’s calculator to find out if you are eligible for MA.


MATB1
The maternity certificate

The MATB1 verifies the pregnancy and confirms the expected week of childbirth (EWC).  Your midwife or doctor will provide you with the MATB1. You will need to give a copy of the MATB1 to prove your pregnancy in order to get SMP.


OML
Ordinary maternity leave

All pregnant employees are entitled to 52 weeks maternity leave. OML is the first 26 weeks of that leave.


OMP
Occupational maternity pay

Your contract or employer’s policies will tell you if you are entitled to pay over and above SMP.  There may be repayment rules if you do not return to work.


Qualifying week

The qualifying week is the 15th week before the expected week of childbirth (EWC). This is around the 26th week of pregnancy. You can work out your qualifying week by finding the Sunday before the date your baby is due – or if due on Sunday, then this is the Sunday you choose – and count 15 Sundays back from there.  The qualifying week is important when deciding if you are entitled to leave and pay.


Relevant period

This is an eight week period used to calculate average weekly earnings for SMP. This period is the eight weeks ending with the last payslip you receive before the end of the qualifying week (see above). You can calculate your entitlement to SMP using the government's calculator.  


ShPP
Shared parental pay

Shared parental pay gives eligible parents the opportunity to share pay during the child's first year. It is available in Scotland, England and Wales. If you do not return to work after maternity leave, you will not have to pay this back. Use the government’s calculator to find out if you are eligible for ShPP.


ShPL
Shared parental leave 

Employees can start ShPL if they’re eligible and they or their partner end their maternity, paternity or adoption leave early.  The remaining leave would be available as SPL. Use the government’s calculator to calculate ShPL.


SMP
Statutory maternity pay

SMP is paid by your employer, just as your wage is.  It is paid for 39 weeks at a higher rate and a lower rate. If you do not return to work after maternity leave, you will not have to pay this back. Use the government’s calculator to find out if you are eligible for SMP.


SPL
Statutory paternity leave

An employee must take his SPL within 56 days of the date of the child’s birth. The rules are different if a child is born prematurely (before the EWC).  SPL can be taken for a period of one week or two weeks in a continuous block. Use the government’s calculator to calculate SPL.


SPLIT days
 Shared parental in touch days

Each parent is allowed up to 20 SPLIT days during shared parental leave. You cannot insist on working SPLIT days. 


SPP
Statutory paternity pay

SPP is payable for the two week statutory paternity leave period at the standard rate, or 90% of average weekly earnings if lower than the standard rate.  If you do not return to work after maternity leave, you will not have to pay this back.  Use the government’s calculator to find out if you are eligible for SPP.

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Page last updated - 25/01/2018