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Royal College of Nursing Representing nurses and nursing, promoting excellence in practice, shaping health policies

Meet the Team

Ruth Northway

Ruth Northway

Forum chair
Professor of Learning Disability Nursing, Faculty of Life Sciences and Education

Ruth worked in a range of residential and community settings supporting people with learning disabilities before moving to work in nurse education in 1989. She previously worked in the School of Nursing in UWCM and took up post at the University of South Wales in 1999.

Since 2002 she has headed the Unit for Development in Intellectual Disabilities (UDID) which is based within the Faculty of Life Sciences and Education. She has published extensively on learning disability nursing.



Ruth Harris

Ruth Harris

Professor of Health Care for Older Adults, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London

Ruth has a clinical background in acute medical nursing and care of older people and has worked as a primary nurse in a King’s Fund funded Nursing Development Unit and as the senior primary nurse/ward manager in a nursing-led intermediate care unit. She has worked in a range of research posts with responsibility to manage and lead research studies and other research activities in clinical and academic settings including as Deputy/ Acting Director of the National Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London. Ruth’s research focuses on the impact of the nursing and multiprofessional work on processes of care and patient outcomes particularly for older people and those with chronic conditions. Her current work includes a NIHR HS&DR funded study to evaluate intentional rounding by nurses and a NIHR HS&DR funded study using EBCD to enhance patient activity in acute stroke units (CREATE study). Her recently completed work includes a scoping review of the evidence for 12-hour shifts in nursing and a NIHR HS&DR funded multimethod study to investigate the effectiveness of interprofessional team-working on outcomes and patient and carer experience of care across stroke care pathways. She is an associate editor of the International Journal of Nursing Studies and a Fellow of the European Academy of Nursing Science.


Daniel Kelly

Daniel Kelly

RCN Professor of Nursing Research, Cardiff University

Daniel was appointed to the Rpyal College Nursing Chair at Cardiff in 2011. Prior to this his career had been spent in cancer nursing practice in Edinburgh and in education at The Royal Marsden Hospital in London. Daniel moved into a Senior Nurse role for research and development at UCL hospitals in London and developed a programme of research on cancer, workforce and assessment of educational needs. Daniel's PhD was in Sociology at Goldsmiths, London University on the experience of prostate cancer. More recently he has been involved in research into workforce, innovation and the social aspects of leadership and quality/safety management in the NHS, he has published on each these topics. Between 2015-17 he is the President of the European Oncology Nursing Society.


Bridie Kent

Bridie Kent

Professor in Leadership in Nursing, Head of School of Nursing and Midwifery and Associate Dean, Plymouth University

Bridie has a background in both clinical and academic appointments, resulting in extensive experience in quality improvement, practice change, health services education and implementation research. For the last 20 years she has played a leading role in evidence-based practice uptake and implementation in the UK, New Zealand and Australia, leading Joanna Briggs Collaborating Centres in each of those counties – currently she is Director of the centre located in Plymouth in the South west of England.   Her research interests focus on knowledge translation (Implementation Science) and practice improvement, primarily in acute care settings.   She is co-lead on the Plymouth University Clinical Schools initiative to increase research capacity and capability for nurses and midwives.  This has seen the development of professorial led units embedded within major healthcare organisations across the region. 
Julie McGarry

Julie McGarry

Associate Professor, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham

Dr Julie McGarry is a registered nurse in adult and mental health practice and an established researcher in the field of gender based violence and domestic violence and abuse (DVA) with a focus towards survivors' experience of abuse and the development of effective health care and allied professionals’ responses. Julie has led on a number of locally and nationally funded research initiatives, working with national and local agencies in the UK in the development of domestic violence services for older women, exploring novel approaches to domestic violence identification and management within healthcare contexts and co-participant arts based narrative projects with survivors of gender based and domestic violence and abuse. Julie's research predominantly utilizes a qualitative approach to enquiry including personal narrative and ethnography – recent work includes personal accounts of survivorship for older women survivors of DVA and personal narratives of female genital mutilation (FGM). Julie has initiated collaborative scholarly partnerships on both international and national levels through leading the inception of the Integrated Domestic Violence and Abuse Research Group, within the Social Futures Centre of Excellence, Institute of Mental Health. Julie has published widely and disseminated her work through national and international conferences and invited keynote speaker presentations. 


Julie Sanders

Director of Clinical Research, Quality and Innovation, St Bartholomew's Hospital

Julie has a clinical and research background in cardiovascular care with a particular research interest in patient recovery after cardiac surgery.  She was previously Chief Operating Officer of the National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research and is currently leading nursing and allied health research capacity and capability development at St Bartholomew's Hospital, which hosts the Barts Heart Centre one of the largest cardiac centres in Europe.





Rachel Taylor

Rachel Taylor

Senior Research Manager, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Rachel worked as a children's nurse before moving into health services research in 1995. After completing her PhD in the children's liver unit at King's College Hospital in 2008 she took up a post-doc fellow post at University College London working with teenagers and young adults with cancer. Since 2011 Rachel has been the lead for applied health research in the Cancer Clinical Trials Unit at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, mainly managing an NIHR programme grant evaluating cancer services for young people in England  (BRIGHTLIGHT) but also a portfolio of work focusing on patient experience and psychosocial outcomes.



Contact

Professional Lead: Ann McMahon

Page last updated - 08/12/2018