arrow_up-blue blog branches consultations events facebook-icon facebook-icon2 factsheet forum-icon forum hands key link location lock mail measure menu_plus news pdf pdf2 phone policies publications related search share subjectguide twitter-icon word youtube-icon

The importance of formal recognition

 Suzan Robinson Southey 15 Aug 2017

Suzan recently went through the credentialing process, recognising advanced level practice in nursing. Here, she talks about her experience and why she applied.

I applied for the credential as a senior nurse in a consultant role. I feel it is important that the advanced practice elements that define the roles such as consultant nurses and ANPs are recognised formally. Especially considering the overall structure of multi-professional health care.

The RCN credential gives formal credibility to the work undertaken in advanced practice and to the academic background and achievements that are required at this level. Working in Australia reinforced this to me, where the advanced practitioner role is much more formalised and structured.
I also feel it’s important for both colleagues and patients to appreciate advanced level practice.

The application process was straight forward and I was give guidance throughout by the RCN team. 

I think examples of previous successful applications would benefit future candidates. I felt the 1000 word reflection I submitted was a valuable piece of work to pull together the application. 

Being credentialed has given me professional credibility and confidence in changing posts. Now that the credential processes are being recognised, it is important I have this. I have more confidence in progressing others through the advanced program, for which I am taking the lead. 

The credential is of value as a consolidation of practice and education, a summary of advanced practice and what it means as a standard. 

Organizationally, the credential will support the development of advancing practice, help medicine to recognise this high standard and give credibility to the professional role. It also gives patients a clear definition and expectation of standards in clinical skills and academic underpinning.

I’d recommend credentialing for clinical credibility, confidence and consolidation, and also for personal and professional bench marking. 

Learn more about credentialing and how to apply




Suzan Robinson Southey

Suzan Robinson Southey

Consultant Nurse Emergency, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Kings Lynn Norfolk