Beatrice Longmire

Complete transcript

Page 1-10

Page 1

FRONT COVER

Page 2

INSIDE FRONT COVER

Page 3

Ex Libris

Album

Ward Lock & Co Limited

London, Melbourne & Toronto

Page 4

B F Longmire

Mar. 17- 1912

Page 5

Violets may faid

Roses may die

Friends may forget

You But never will I

 

EH Falkenbury 491180

4th Canadians

Page 6

May your part Be awayes wake

Darling muse and I wish you

Happy (hapey) and a darling sweetheart

That you like last chance

Your life always

Pr Stanley Morris

Hi com 3rd rifles

Witley camp No30334 H & 8

Sunney England

Page 7

4/30/18

If I were in the market

I would certainly bid for – you.

B Penny

44717

3rd  R C England

Be good sweet maid

and let who will be clever

Do noble deeds

Don’t dream them all day long,

And thus make life,

Death, and that vast forever

One grand sweet song

M. K. Henderson

E. C. H

12/10/16

Page 8

The liquid that appeals to me

is wazzamazzapazza (waggamaggapagga) Tea

Toast, Butter, Marm’lade pear or app

Completes my brek and leaves me hap

A smoke of course (if I’ve got any)

I whiff a woodbine (five a penny)

Shakespeare (Shakespoke)

One of the Diehards 16th Med

3rd A/ M. W. R Martin 34052 (134502)

Royal Air Force

S. A. R. D

South Farnborough

April

30/4/18

Page 9

[Image]

Why is it Dearest Bertie,

You have got upon the Rocks?

Was it Diamonds for Gertie?

Or YOUR LAVISH

TASTE iN SOCKS

From L.O.J 29/4/12 Maimie Watson

Page 10

Remember me is all I ask-

But, should remembrance prove a task,

Forget me

-Maimie Watson

Helen Carter   Mar: 18th 1912

Page 11-20

Page 11

If writing in Albums
Rememberance Keeps Insured
with the greatest of pleasure
I’ll scribble in yours
----- ---- ----- ---- EDB
May your days be always happy
And your smiles be always gay
May you never Know Misfortune
While you tread this iolary  way.
---- --- ---  ----   ----  ----
Cocci  ??
3181023
John M Mad Lerd

April 30th 1918
S.B. Canadian Royal Artillery

Page 12

BLANK

Page 13

11/30/18.
A faint heart never won
A fair lady.
E. E. Loney.
31305in
4th R10. Bramolot
How far that little candle throws his beams!
So shines A good deed in A naughty world.
ShakespeAre.

[image] M. Joey Riddel.
[image]
12th June 1916

Page 14

“ As unto the bow the cord is,
   So unto the man is woman;
   Though she bends him, she obeys him,
   Though she draws him, yet she follows”
(“Longfellow.”)
Therefore never    [image]
                   never     [image] 
                   always   [image]
                   [image]
James D Campbell
18th[image] June 1916

Page 15

“ Don’t go about with a face like a fiddle”;
Cast out Despondence, that dull, dismal elf.
Here is the answer - 2 life’s solemn riddle –
Happiness comes from forgetting oneself.
Look on the bright side, for that is the right side, 
Hiding your troubles away on the shelf
21/5/17                  A, F, W
                                [image]
[image]
Lillie R. Barlas.
April 6. 1912
[image]

Page 16

“O MANY A SHAFT, AT RANDOM SENT,
FINDS MARK THE ARCHER LITTLE MEANT!
AND MANY A WORD, AT RANDOM SPOKEN,
MAY SOOTHE OR WOUND A HEART THAT’S BROKEN!”
April 1912                        N.R.B.

Page 17

INEXPERIENCED

W.H.Werton
(RFN)
394822
Q.V.R
[image]
O.E. Bond
(RFN)
006065
L.R.B.
[image]

Page 18

Oh wouldn’t the days seem dull & long.
If all went right, & nothing went wrong;
And wouldn’t one’s life be awfully flat
With nothing at all to grumble at.

17/4/12.
[image]

CMC. .
[image]

Page 19

1.
Heare’s To The one That’s. good.
And sweet Heare’s To The one.
If hats True Heare’s To The one
That Rules my heart
In other words Heare’s 
To you.
[image]

C.H. Falkenbury. 491180
4th Canadian’s.

Page 20

The Mills of God grind slowly,
But they grind exceeding small,
So soft and slow, the great wheels go,
They hardly move at all,
And the souls of men, fall into them,
And are powdered into dust,
But from that dust, spring sweet white flowers,
“Faith” “Hope” & “Trust”

Norman Ogle
57259
NZMC
20/2/18


Page 21-30

Page 21

J. Johnson. 18.1.14
Were not the stars part of our life
We would not see them shining there
Did not perfection end the strife
We would not dream its’ grandeur here
If souls were killed in dying breath
We should not ponder love and death.
Geoffrey Ogle. 3/3578
N.Z.M.C. 22/2/18

Page 22

When on this book you smile,
When on this book you frown
Think of the one who spoilt it
By writing upside down.
F. MacL.
April 18. 1912.

Page 23

[image]
If you have the gift of seeing,
Never look for beauty:
Noting faults in all your friends
Is plainly not your duty.
If you have the gift of hearing,
List to what is sweet:
Shut your ears to every thing
That is not good and sweet.
If you have the gift of talking
Use but pleasant words:
Let your speech be glad & cheery,
As the songs of birds.
Margaret Wyllie
at Burnlea, Piltochry. Sep 6th [image] 1912.

Page 24

“ ? joy! That in our embers
Is something that doth live,
That nature yet remembers
What was so fugitive!”
W. Wordsworth.
A.K. Coates
20/10/15

Page 25

18/03/12
[Stamp]
By Gum
It’s StucK
Betty Blyson

Page 26

I’m not an artist nor a poet,
So take my love with you.
As I hope you good luck.
B.Y.L.H. Phipps
249th Batt. No. 1069?15
C.E.M. ?

Page 27

Recipe
For a Wedding :- To one summer’s night add two young persons, a beach, and a little propinquity. Mix in one lock of wavy hair, an atom of delicate perfume, and stir with a slight breeze. Sprinkle the whole with moonlight and let alone for the evening.
Q Kennedy
22nd April 1912

Page 28

BLANK

Page 29

Above is a sketch of a “zeppeline” out of sight
D.E.C.
10-11-17
night. duty. 10-11-17
Oh little book.- Oh little book.
You are a dreadful bore.
You’ve made me waste a whole nights’ “?Mike?”
And worried me full sore
- - - - - - - -
One consolation that I have.
That fills my heart with glee,
You’ll worry “Trixie’s” other friends.
As you have worried me.
D.E.Commander.

Page 30

“A thought for to-day”
“Never lose an opportunity of seeing anything beautiful; beauty is God’s handiwork, a wayside sacrament.” ____
Charles Kingsby.
D Jacob
19.1.18


Page 31-40

Page 31

“He who knows not, and knows not that he knows not, is a fool_____ shun him.
He who knows not and knows that he knows not, is humble_____ teach him.
He who knows, and knows not that he knows, is asleep._____ wake him.
He who knows, and knows that he knows, is a wise man _____ follow him.”
27.4.12                                                       Janie C Watson

Page 32

BLANK

Page 33

(the ideal)

Nursing its Ideals & Realities
Before I came to be a nurse
I thought no work could be so gloriously great & grand as nursing seemed to me 
I thought each Sister was a Saint
In sober cap & gown
A being from a brighter sphere
To heaven worlds come down


Before I came to be a nurse
Bright visions filled my mind
Of woman’s highest ministry
Of nurses calm and kind
I thought the wards were always clean
The patients good as gold
And always full of gratitude
And thankfulness untold


Before I came to be a nurse
I studied what I could
And mastered all the details 
I thought a novice should
I went to “first aid” lectures
And the ambulance exam
And did my best the bones and joints
And all their names to cram


Before I came to be a nurse
I thought that every one
Would be so glad to keep me on
And show me what was done
I thought the all would be my friends
And take me by the hand
And welcome me most cordially
To join their happy band


I thought that nurses never cried
Or made the least mistake
Nor ever minded what they did
It was for duty’s sake
I never thought of friction there
Between those happy souls
Whose bond of union is their work
And love each act controls


I thought within those cheerful wards
There was nothing much to do
But just a “dressing” here and there
Or “poultice” to renew
I thought to sit from morn to night
Beside the couch of pain
And gently bathe the fevered brow
And soothe the troubled brain


Page 34

“The Reality”
But afterward a change came o’er
The spirit of my dream
And very soon I found that things
Are not just what they seem
I dreamt of gentle ministry
Amongst the suffering poor
Instead they made me take a broom
And learn to sweep the floor,


I thought I knew the alphabet
At least my A.B.C.
But certain cabalistic signs 
Were all in “Greek” to me
I struggles over P.R.N.
C.H. and S.C.S
But what they meant to signify
I simply could not guess


I went to the dispensary
some dozen times a day
I fetched the patients every meal
And cleared them all away
The duster & the scrubbing brush
Were seldom out of sight
While story books & fancy work
Now never saw the light


My bandaging was insecure
My dressings all came off
My poultices when made were such
As made the nurses scoff
They said I did not raise them well
The water was not hot
Oh, dear the water I was in
Was hot if they were not


I needed not phrenologist to point out my defects
I had so many candid friends
My failings to dissect
I soon had not a virtue left
If ever I had one
It banished in that hospital 
And left me there with none.
But though I could not help but make
My castle in the dust
It helped me form an estimate
A thousand times more just
Of what a nurses life should be 
From every point of view
And then I looked with different eyes
On all I had to do


And so in spite of all that’s hard
In spite of tired feet
There’s something in this busy life
A something that is sweet
And if I had my choice again
I still would be a nurse
And take the cap & apron
For better or for worse


E. I. Mackoy
R. S.N Inst
Edinburgh
1913

Page 35

May 2nd 1918
(Drawing of thistle)
WHERE.EVER.YOU MAY WANDER
HIGH OR LOW
BE TRUE TO YOUR COUNTRY
WHERE EVER YOU GO
Wm NICOLSON
ISOLATION HOSPITAL 
ALDERSHOT

Page 36

BLANK

Page 37

(WATERCOLOUR OF BLUE FLOWER)
MJB
8TH AP

Page 38

Being all fashioned of the self-same dust
Let us be merciful as well as just.

James L. Chisholm
18/6/16.

Page 39

They talk about a woman’s sphere as though it had a limit.
There’s not a place in earth or heaven,
Not a task to mankind given,
Not a blessing or a woe,
Not a whisper “yes” or “no”?
Not a life or death or birth
That has a feather’s weight of worth,
Without a woman in it.

J. Gracie
14.10.15

Page 40

A Tear
When friendship or love our sympathies move,
When truth in a glance should appear,
The lips may beguile with a dimple or smile,
But the test of affection’s a tear.

Jas Carmichael
8/4/12



Page 41-50

Page 41 

 

[Image]

Coat of Arms

U B I O U E

PROGRAMME OF MUSIC.

  1. March‘’Le Rive Passe’’Krier
  2. Selection‘’Tonight’s the Night’’Rubens
  3. Valse‘Vision D’Amour’’Joyce
  4. Dances Nos. 2&1‘’In Days of Old’’Ball
  5. Selection‘’Maid of the Mountains’’Fraser-Simson
  6. Cornet Solo‘’A Perfect Day’’Jacobs – Bond
  7. Morceau‘’Je Sais que vous etes JolieChristine
  8. Valse‘Night’s of Gladness’’Ancliffe

(Sd) A. Bruner B.S.M. BANDMASTER

5th Jan 1918 Royal Garrison Artillery, Portsmouth.

 

 

[Image]

Gloucester Castle as seen at Stokes Bay. 1917

 

[Image]

Six sergeants acted as bearers at the funeral at Gosport of Nurse H. K. Vere Taylor, the wife of an Australian soldier, and daughter of Mr. S. Keeper Brown, Gosport. Col. Childe and a large number of nurses and wounded soldiers, including Americans, attended.

[Folded newspaper cutting – illegible]

 

Page 42

 

[Image]

Coat of Arms

U B I O U E

PROGRAMME OF MUSIC.

  1. March‘’Le Rive Passe’’Krier
  2. Selection‘’Tonight’s the Night’’Rubens
  3. Valse‘Vision D’Amour’’Joyce
  4. Dances Nos. 2&1‘’In Days of Old’’Ball
  5. Selection‘’Maid of the Mountains’’Fraser-Simson
  6. Cornet Solo‘’A Perfect Day’’Jacobs – Bond
  7. Morceau‘’Je Sais que vous etes JolieChristine
  8. Valse‘Night’s of Gladness’’Ancliffe

(Sd) A. Bruner B.S.M. BANDMASTER

5th Jan 1918 Royal Garrison Artillery, Portsmouth.

 

 

[Image]

Gloucester Castle as seen at Stokes Bay. 1917

 

[Image]

Six sergeants acted as bearers at the funeral at Gosport of Nurse H. K. Vere Taylor, the wife of an Australian soldier, and daughter of Mr. S. Keeper Brown, Gosport. Col. Childe and a large number of nurses and wounded soldiers, including Americans, attended.

[Folded newspaper cutting – illegible]

 

 

Page 43

[Image]

Coat of Arms

U B I O U E

PROGRAMME OF MUSIC.

  1. March‘’Le Rive Passe’’Krier
  2. Selection‘’Tonight’s the Night’’Rubens
  3. Valse‘Vision D’Amour’’Joyce
  4. Dances Nos. 2&1‘’In Days of Old’’Ball
  5. Selection‘’Maid of the Mountains’’Fraser-Simson
  6. Cornet Solo‘’A Perfect Day’’Jacobs – Bond
  7. Morceau‘’Je Sais que vous etes JolieChristine
  8. Valse‘Night’s of Gladness’’Ancliffe

(Sd) A. Bruner B.S.M. BANDMASTER

5th Jan 1918 Royal Garrison Artillery, Portsmouth.

 

 

[Image]

Gloucester Castle as seen at Stokes Bay. 1917

 

[Image]

Six sergeants acted as bearers at the funeral at Gosport of Nurse H. K. Vere Taylor, the wife of an Australian soldier, and daughter of Mr. S. Keeper Brown, Gosport. Col. Childe and a large number of nurses and wounded soldiers, including Americans, attended.

[Folded newspaper cutting – illegible]

 

 

 

Page 44 

[Image]

5th SOUTHERN GENERALHOSPITA. EXTERIOR BLOCK B.

Unit V

 

[Image]

N. James   S. Flack    N. Lupton  &  S. Twine  &  Orderlies

Operating Theatre.

 

[Image]

5TH SOUTHERN GENERAL HOSPITAL. UNIT 2 WARD.

 

 

 

Page 45

[Pencil drawing protected by a flimsy]
Sketch By – F. Edgar Beeson Southsea 1918
.PORTSMOUTH-HARBOUR-SHOWING-H.M.S.-VICTORY. 

 

 

 

Page 46

[Image]
The first photograph of H.M.S. Repulse, which has arrived at Portsmouth from the Grand Fleet. This ‘’Hush Hush’’ battleship built after war broke out, has a displacement of about 25,000 tons, and is equipped with the most powerful guns yet designed for warship armament. 

[Image]

[Image]

[Image]
E. Walsh

[Image]
RAILWAYMEN’S TRIBUTE TO MISS ORDE-POWLETT -AT THE 5TH S’ERN GENB** HO****
ILLUMINATED ADDRESS. AUTOGRAPH BOOK  AND FRAMED PHOTOS – JUN 1919 (?)   

[Newspaper cutting]
Miss Beryl Orde-Powlett, daugh – ter of Col. Orde-Powlett, of Southsea, who, voluntarily and without a break, drove an ambu - lance, without mishap, through – out the war. She drove 40,000 (illegible) wounded. 

 

 

Page 47

[Pencil drawing]
A H Hand

[Image]
Pte. Willoughby.

[Image]
Femur Hut. Unit I

[Image]
Patients Unit II

 

 

Page 48

[Newspaper cutting]
NELSON’S  ‘’VICTORY’’ LOOKS DOWN ON U-BOATS
[Image]
Escorted by a procession representing all the crafts in the Portsmouth Naval Command, the German U-boats 123 and 141 were taken into Portsmouth Harbour yesterday. The photograph shows one of the U-boats passing into captivity under the shadow of Nelson’s flagship Victory. – ( Daily Sketch)

 

 

Page 49 

[Newspaper cutting]
[Image]
Minesweepers at Portsmouth getting up steam for their world’s record sea-sweeping task. In the North Sea alone the minefield covers an area of 2,000 square miles, and over 400 vessels, all manned by volunteer crews, will be engaged in the arduous and dangerous work. Towering above the mosquito craft is the ‘’hush ship’ Repulse. – (Exclusive.)

[Image]
The surrendered pirate craft. As a result of their being on show  the funds of the Sailors’ and Marines’ Orphans’ Home will benefit. 

[Newspaper cutting[
[Image]
A striking photograph shows the British Ensign floating above the German flag on board two of the surrendered U-boats, which are now on view at Portsmouth and attracting large crowds of visitors. 

[Image]
Mr. Foran & A.P.M.  Portsmouth.

 

 

Page 50

[Letter]

April 2nd 1919

Dear Madam,

I wish to inform you that you will be demobilised on Monday April 7th 1919, owing to reduction of Staff.

Will you kindly fill in the enclosed Insurance Form, and return to me immediately.

Yours faithfully,

L. Allcock.

[Signature]

Principal Matron. T.F.N.S.

5th Southern General Hospital.

Miss J. Angois. V.A.D.

Fawcett Rd Section.

 

Page 51-60

Page 51

Best of Luck [image]
[ image ]
May 1st 18
Gunner R Head.
R.F.a.
Waterloo Barracks.
Aldershot.
MAY THIS LUCKY BLACK CAT
BRING GOOD FORTUNE TO YOU
AND THE BEST OF GOOD LUCK
IN WHATEVER YOU DO [ image ]

Page 52

When the golden sun is setting,
And your heart from care is free,
While of others you are thinking,
Will you sometimes think of me?”
E.M. Watson
29/4/12

Page 53

Rejoice and we will seek you
Grieve and they turn and go
They want full measure of your pleasure
But they do not want your woe
Be glad and your friends are many
Be sad and you lose them all 
There are more to decline your xxxxxx wine
But alone you must drink life’s gall
Jean Cameron#
17th March 1913

Page 54

Fall from the mast head on to the deck,
Fall from the house top & break your neck
Fall to the earth from the sky above;
Anywhere, everywhere but don’t
“Fall in Love”.
Jean Fraser,
Pilochxxx
22.5.12

Page 55

I first got the measles
And then a number 
Nine
But if I hadn’t have
Had that number I
Couldn’t have done 
These lines
Pte Alfred Lister Canadians
15 Res Batt

Page 56

[Image ]
I write, and then the book I close.
Conscious that within repose
My wishes – pray let others see,
Where’ ere I am,
Where’ ere I be,
You sometimes spare a thought for me,
As I shall spare a thought for thee.
Annie Cameron
17th March
1913

Page 57

Spring
You may talk of the signs of the weather
Of coming days you may sing;
But sitting down on a red hot stove
Is the sign of an early Spring.
D.R.S.
8th April 1912

Page 58

Tis sweet to court
Yet oh,’ how bitten!
To court a girl
And then not – get her’’..
29-4-18
B Green
1st S.A.I.

Page 59

Ina S. Robertson
29’’5’’12.
Go to Father


Go to Father, she said,
When he asked her to wed,
Go to Father.
For she knew,
That he knew,
What a life he had led.
And she knew 
That he knew
That her Father, was dead
Thus she knew, that he knew
What she meant, when she said
Go to Father

Page 60

A lonely spot
Is the isolation Hospital Aldershot

W.J.S.S.K.E
1-5-18


Page 61-66

Page 61

I learn as the years roll forward,
And leave the past behind,
That much I have counted sorrows
But xxxxx that our God is kind.
That many a flower I longed for,
Had a hidden thorn of pain,
And many a stray bypath
Led to a field of grain.


The clouds but court the sunshine,
They cannot banish the sun –
And the earth shines out the brighter
When the weary rain is done.
We must stand in the deepest shadows
To see the clearest light,
And often from wrong’s own darkness
Comes the very strength fright.
Catherine R Lowe
29.6.12

Page 62

[Image ]                           
1.ENLISTMENT                  

[IMAGE ]
 THE TRANSPORT.

[ IMAGE ]                          
[ IMAGE ]                                         
[ IMAGE ]

3.PACK DRILL
4. MEASLES and Malaria
5.    “KAMERAD!  KAMERAD!”
6. GRAND FINALE !         

Incedents in the life of the S.A Tommy.
Military isolation Hospital
29th April 1918
yours xxxx 
H H FRAMZOEN ( 2nd SAI )



“ Some men inherit money
Others inherit disease.
God id Love.”
Sincerely Yours
Xx xxxxx 
2nd S A x

Military Isolation Hospital
Aldershot
30th April 1918.

Page 63

20/9/12.
I’ve turned these pages o’er & o’er
To see what others have written
And in this secluded spot
I simply write forget me – not
P Campbell

Page 64

Smile awhile,
And while you smile
Another smiles;
And soon there’s miles and miles
Of smiles,
And life’s worth while
While you smile.

Wounded
Ypres
3.10.17
R.C. Barnwell
Honorable artillery Co
3.5.18

Page 65

BLANK

Page 66

By Hook or by Crook
I’ll be last in
This book
P.t Ballantyne.

When his heart is wildly beating,
And he is a kiss entreating,
She exclaims, so coy, retreating,
“That’s a nice idea!”

When into her blue orbs gazing,
And her pretty peepers praising,
He exclaims, with love amazing,
 That’s a nice eye dear!”

When the honeymoon is over,
And they no more live in clover,
He exclaims, (unfeeling rover)
 That’s a nice sigh, dear!”

When their bands they wish to sever,
By  The President”, so clever,
Both exclaim – and part for ever,
“That’s a nissi, dear!”
6/8/16
C.G.B.